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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    What is the distance traveled?

    Is it far enough for an Musk hyperloop?
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    suburban. no.
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    I rode it a few times. Santa Cruz to San Jose over the mountains in a nice little bus, then onto the light rail up the valley to a weird little stop in the Mission district of SF, and back again. I remember the bus better than the trains but they were all pretty nice.
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    You might not be talking about Light Rail, which is primarily downtown and is what I posted about. You're probably talking about CalTrans or BART.
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    Maybe. All I know is that it ran on rails, was lighter than a real choochoo train, and ran up and down the valley.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Why is it hyperloop? Where's the "loop"? Other than in the reasoning?
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    In the age of Quenco, steam will make a big come back.

    Choo, choo to delight again soon?
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    I've been trolling the blogs with the Hyperloop in mind, and shit, there are some stupid people out there. Here's one of the very few substantive comments I found so far (emphasis added by me)

    Solving the Kantrowitz limit was by far the most challenging. Without solving it first high speed tube travel was not just hard but simply impossible.

    As for swapping out the heat storage, I think that is pretty trivial considering that they will also swap out the battery at each terminal and replace it with a charged one. Plus, the baggage compartment gets swapped out too so the capsule is not delayed while passengers get their baggage. The turnaround time at each terminal is only 5 minutes. Keep in mind that these capsules are traveling only 30 seconds apart during peak time, so we can assume all of this swapping will be pretty much robotics.

    Elevation changes are designed in for crossing over freeway overpasses etc. The capsules are kept centered in the tube 360 degrees by the air bearings, so curves are not really too big of a problem. The design has the ability to take two different curves at two different speeds.

    This will be a "state" project too, in that it is impossible to do without the government right-of-way on I-5 & I-580 and it will have municipal bond financing.

    I'm curious to see Richard Branson's take on this. Between his railroad empire and Virgin Air, his opinion would be significant. I bet he wants the pod manufacturing contract, it would be right up his alley.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanAs for swapping out the heat storage, I think that is pretty trivial considering that they will also swap out the battery at each terminal and replace it with a charged one. Plus, the baggage compartment gets swapped out too so the capsule is not delayed while passengers get their baggage.


    You don't have to make high pressure connections to live steam for the baggage. Or even the batteries. They are much easier to swap than a steam chest. I like Al's idea, but the liquid helium is probably not necessary. LN2 might do. Most of the energy goes into the phase change. The problem will be that the latent heat of fusion is small, 334 kJ/kg for water, compared to the latent heat of vaporisation, 2260 kJ/kg for water. So you need to up the 300 kg of water to a couple of metric tonnes of ice. The design weight of the vehicle in the proposal is around 4 metric tonnes so this is not insignificant.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Of course if there is an accident you could bleed the high pressure steam into a Rankine engine and turn the thing into a choo choo to get to the nearest exit.
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    I agree in general terms. Here's the best article I've found online on the Hyperloop thus far.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/10240535/The-Hyperloop-flawed-fantasy-or-achievable-challenge.html
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    CN

    The People's Hyperloop: Redditors rally for Musk's vision.

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57598374-1/the-peoples-hyperloop-redditors-rally-for-musks-vision/

    One little problem nobody seems to be addressing yet is security.

    What with surgically implanted explosive for inside the tube and car or lorry bombs to damage the tube itself as it goes along roads.

    Can it be made safe?
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Posted By: TrimCan it be made safe?

    Can railways?
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013 edited
     
    The silliest thing is the price tag - $6.3B!! Are they planning to use Chinese migrants and build it from Lego?

    The UK high speed train network estimated cost is up to £50B now, and it's sure to go over budget.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Posted By: BigOilRepThe silliest thing is the price tag - $6.3B!! Are they planning to use Chinese migrants and build it from Lego?

    The UK high speed train network estimated cost is up to £50B now, and it's sure to go over budget.


    They haven't costed buying land, getting planning approval, jumping NIMBY hurdles. They haven't even costed R&D. They have simply said "if this" then estimate = $6.3B". It is silly - but possibly only if you think it is saying something else.

    But then folks said you couldn't do space for SpaceX costs.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Yup - that's how Musk got this podium.

    It's a fun project to think about, anyway. Crowd engineering of critical infrastructure.
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    I just remembered why I was getting these feelings of déjà vu:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEZjzsnPhnw
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Musk's doesn't have any rail, which proves the existence of zero. I told you so.
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    True, but it looks like Musk is smart enough not to put all his goose eggs in one basket.