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  1.  
    Is ABBA the lowest common denominator of popular music?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2013
     
    Rap/Hiphop is. ABBA is next.
  2.  
    I had to lie down and gnash at the carpet after that
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013 edited
     
    There may be a slight delay in delivering your order.

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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013 edited
     
    How to tell if you are going to commit *CFIT:

    http://flightsafety.org/files/cfit_check.pdf




    * controlled flight into terrain
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013 edited
     
    Where is everybody tonight?

    For the world travelers out there.... does your pilot know how to land your airplane in an emergency? Does the co-pilot _ever_ get to practice landing the f***ing airplane?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rBHqu1Mxds

    (A speech synthesizer reading a text, but it's a good one. This information is being suppressed, and you can probably tell why. The vid probably won't be up long.)

    In some Asian airlines, like Asiana, a co-pilot only lands the simulator, except at a few home airports in good weather. Otherwise all landings are handled by the command pilot. That means... a pilot moves from the right seat, into the left seat command status, with only a few actual landings, even though he or she might have a thousand hours logged. And all of those actual landings will be at familiar fields and on full ILS data and full aircraft automation. Think about it.
  3.  
    My problem as a glider towpilot was exactly the opposite. If I wasn't doing six or eight takeoffs and landings per flight hour the towplane wasn't making money. So when I tell someone I have 2400 hours as PIC and over ten thousand takeoffs and landings, many of them dead-stick .... they always look at me funny.



    (Those dead-stick takeoffs are great fun.)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeQP-H_31JQ
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013 edited
     
    You give meaning to the stewardess' announcement "We will be taking off momentarily."

    Why dead-stick? Trying to save fuel?
  4.  
    What goes up, must come down. I flew at both ends of the towrope. Not simultaneously, usually....
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinMy problem as a glider towpilot was exactly the opposite. If I wasn't doing six or eight takeoffs and landings per flight hour the towplane wasn't making money. So when I tell someone I have 2400 hours as PIC and over ten thousand takeoffs and landings, many of them dead-stick .... they always look at me funny.



    (Those dead-stick takeoffs are great fun.)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeQP-H_31JQ
    Cool video, but if he`d hit a rock on that (very steep!) hill, it would have been game over.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rBHqu1Mxds

    (A speech synthesizer reading a text, but it's a good one. This information is being suppressed, and you can probably tell why. The vid probably won't be up long.)


    Why do people present text in this awful. slow, and obnoxious manner? Can't the kids read any more? I think they still need that skill in order to text.

    New article: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-16/ups-crew-warned-plane-was-sinking-too-fast-before-crash.html

    Also, the main runway was out of service and the alternate did not have ILS. Also the pilots may have been fatigued. All in the article. Not in the article but from a radio report, the sink rate was appx 6000 FPM obviously briefly.

    Very Very Old GPWS (TAWS)
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: maryyugoWhy do people present text in this awful. slow, and obnoxious manner? Can't the kids read any more? I think they still need that skill in order to text.


    That particular series of videos is produced as listening practice for the English qualification exam that all nonnative Anglo-nonphonic transport category pilots and FOs must pass in order to be allowed to fly in international airspace.

    The particular _reading_ there, is strongly critical of aspects of the Asian, specifically Korean, flight training programs that put emphasis on the "magenta line" rather than airmanship, and do not foster good cockpit resource management procedures on the part of crews. It is from a VOA report that was almost immediately removed from VOA's own website, and will probably be taken down in this form as well, because of its extreme political incorrectness.


    Posted By: maryyugoAlso, the main runway was out of service and the alternate did not have ILS. Also the pilots may have been fatigued. All in the article. Not in the article but from a radio report, the sink rate was appx 6000 FPM obviously briefly.


    The main problem at this point seems to be that the pilots were not stabilized in the approach for some reason, but also.... there is a fucking HILL that seems to be cleared by only 50 feet or so on _normal_ approaches to that runway. The hill that broke the airplane, in fact, after it hit the trees and maybe powerlines a bit earlier.

    So NTSB is going over the approach itself, because it is now looking like the PAPI might not have actually provided the full one degree clearance above the obstacles. But it is also true that the pilots should have seen a row of all red lights on the PAPI well before they hit the trees, or got the EGPWS alert.

    Unstable approach to a non-routine (but not unfamiliar) approach at night with slight weather, combined with marginal obstacle clearance on the published approach, combined with a complacent and fatigued crew not properly briefed for the approach... == increased chances of CFIT.
    Unfortunately... QED.
  5.  
    Posted By: LakesCool video, but if he`d hit a rock on that (very steep!) hill, it would have been game over.

    Yep, I concur, he's got bigger balls than I've got for sure.
    I might have tried it, but with the engine already started at idle, and having paced the area off as far down the slope as I dared clamber.
    The landing on the sandbar is not a problem, you can see the tracks from his earlier flights. 2 miles distance, 1500 feet, that requires a glide ratio of about 7:1 in no-wind conditions. There is clearly some lift during the first part of the flight, and he evidently had to slip off some altitude on final approach to the sandbar. Easy, once the thing is in the air.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2013
     
    Ill-fated UPS jet was on autopilot seconds before crash


    http://in.reuters.com/article/2013/08/17/usa-crash-ups-idINL2N0GI0GM20130817
  6.  
    Yeah, nothing wrong with anything except the pilots. They just landed the airplane a mile short, that's all.
  7.  
    Chinese rail and immense corruption

    China’s most famous public-works project was an ecosystem almost perfectly hospitable to corruption—opaque, unsupervised, and overflowing with cash, especially after the government announced a stimulus to mitigate the effects of the 2008 global financial crisis. It boosted funding for railway projects to more than a hundred billion dollars in 2010. In some cases, the bidding period was truncated from five days to thirteen hours. In others, the bids were mere theatre, because construction had already begun. Cash was known to vanish: in one instance, seventy-eight million dollars that had been set aside to compensate people whose homes had been demolished to make way for railroad tracks disappeared. Middlemen expected cuts of between one and six per cent. “If a project is four and a half billion, the middleman is taking home two hundred million,” Wang said. “And, of course, nobody says a word.”

    One of the most common rackets was illegal subcontracting. A single contract could be divvied up and sold for kickbacks, then sold again and again, until it reached the bottom of a food chain of labor, where the workers were cheap and unskilled. (The practice is hardly unique to the railways: in 2010, a rookie welder employed by an illegal subcontractor was working on a dormitory in Shanghai when he dropped his torch and set the building on fire; fifty-eight people died.) In November, 2011, a former cook with no engineering experience was found to be building a high-speed railway bridge using a crew of unskilled migrant laborers who substituted crushed stones for cement in the foundation. In railway circles, the practice of substituting cheap materials for real ones was common enough to rate its own expression: touliang huanzhu—robbing the beams to put in the pillars.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2013
     
    Thermodynamics.
  8.  
    You mean as applied to cash instead of molecules?
  9.  
    Money flows uphill, shit flows downhill.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanYou mean as applied to cash instead of molecules?

    Cash as a proxy for wealth/energy? Yes.