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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2020 edited
     
    Half a mil SUV? The Cullinan by RR:



    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2020 edited
     
    Nobody still expects the Grand Inflation? Downsize while you can or feel the crunch.

    It's going to be hurtful once the awakening kicks in.

    Those Billionaires won't feed themselves, you lazy commoners. Up, up!
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2020
     
    All that crap just to make the car go from A to B. Reminds me of some 1920s radios--knobs and controls on everything just to hear what someone was saying.

    How about, say, a steering wheel, accelerator and brake-only model? I suppose a speedometer might be useful, as well as a fuel gauge.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    No, it's not for transportation. It's for prestige.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    I tend to believe that even in the post pandemic USA such a vulgar display of excessive wealth will be met with a frown or two. Only speculating, of course.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    Fisher Price?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020 edited
     
    Federal 59. Just the thing to listen to the "A&P Gypsies" on.

    Cullinan curb weight (net) = 6069 lbs. Just over 3 tons.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    Good times. All those masons who worked so hard in the radio factories had to file for unemployment once the transistor was discovered and they were no longer needed.
    Freemasons still exist today.

    The same will happen to programmers once the DNN psychologists take over.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    What did in the TRF radios of the 1920s was the superheterodyne--and AC line-powered DC supplies. It was only a couple of years between that Federal and the two-knob superhets with AVC that followed. A superhet is more complex electronically, but when adjusted, needs no fiddling.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    Posted By: AsterixHow about, say, a steering wheel, accelerator and brake-only model? I suppose a speedometer might be useful, as well as a fuel gauge.


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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    Cute. A cockroach with wheels. You will be soo rich! *snicker*
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    The original model had no fuel gauge, but rather a reserve tank you could switch in. I don't know if it had a speedometer.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020 edited
     
    We had two of them in our household. One was dark green, the other bright orange. They both smelled the same.

    The brake/climate control interface assembly always reminded me of a broiled chicken. The rubbery cover even had a goosebumpy texture.


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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    Now that is truly disgusting.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    And that is only the deboned skin without the neck and the wings.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2020
     
    Posted By: AngusThe original model had no fuel gauge, but rather a reserve tank you could switch in. I don't know if it had a speedometer.


    One of my friends had one of the early ones. He fashioned a dipstick to check the fuel. IIRC, it did have a speedometer; probably required by law.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 21st 2021 edited
     
    Looking at the specs of the Ford F-150 (and Tesla model S), I got to wondering how efficient these were in comparison to say, a 1960's Greyhound bus.

    Gross vehicle weight (max): d4505: 22,680 kg. Luggage Compartment Volume*:, D4505: 14.64 cu m.


    Passenger capacity is 55-61, depending on seating configuration. So, 22680/55 = 412 kg. / passenger (that includes passenger weight and luggage). Estimating 100 kg for average passenger and luggage = 312 kg. vehicle weight per passenger.

    Tesla roadster: curb weight: 1307 kg. or 653 kg./passenger, more than twice that of the bus.
  1.  
    So you feel that, by comparing the Kg/person figure for a mass transit vehicle versus a passenger vehicle, you have proved something of interest? Is this because you want to ding electric vehicles in general? Have you run the same calculation for an ICE bus vs an EV bus?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMay 21st 2021 edited
     
    Not at all, but walking along this morning, I reflected on my per-passenger overhead was the weight of my shoes; that of my dogs was essentially the weight of their harnesses (maybe 0.5 kg. combined) Were I to ride a bicycle, that would add about 10-15 kg per passenger. A motorcycle might be 100 kg. A 1972 Super Beetle, seats 4 and weighs 860 kg or 215 kg/passenger.

    What got me was the utter waste in one using an F250 truck to mail a letter.

    Historically, what's been the trend in per-person transport efficiency? Consider that the ultimate goal is to transport a person from point A to point B in a reasonable amount of time. Forget Fahrvergn├╝gen.

    Consider the old saw about nobody really wanting a power drill with a quarter-inch bit--what really has value is a quarter-inch hole.