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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2021 edited
     
    Can't wait for all of your stupid excuses once the Zombie Apocalypse is in full swing...
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    I was more than a little taken aback when the Philips audio cassette became an audiophile medium. Talk about a technology inappropriate to the medium. Yet, when there was a suitable medium, DAT, the US actively blocked its adoption with the AHRA. I still have a Sony DAT Walkman here, but I doubt that it still works--it is one mechanically complicated device with lots of tiny parts.
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    There is probably still a storefront in Toronto where you can buy those tiny little parts.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    ...and damned few people to stick 'em in. My guess is a belt that's turned to goo.
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    That same storefront has a box full of all different sizes of belts for all those little mechanical marvels. At first I thought they were just black rubber bands and I couldn't figure out why anyone would pay a Canadian dollar for a little rubber band. Then I saw the application chart. Probably 40 or 50 different belt sizes available. Not listed? Bring your old one and we will try to match it.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    I'm no watchmaker. I'm not sure that I'm up to repairing this thing.

    Maybe I'll just spritz a bunch of contact cleaner into the works and see what happens...
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    Posted By: AsterixI was more than a little taken aback when the Philips audio cassette became an audiophile medium. Talk about a technology inappropriate to the medium.


    Why? Audio is full of snake oil. Magnetic tape is quite capable within it's limitations.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021 edited
     
    Dicey transport mechanism, narrow multitrack tape (S/N ratio), slow tape speed etc. Would a studio professional be caught dead using it?

    Maybe there were some 4-motor 3 head decks produced, but I'm not aware of any.
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    I have a "new old stock" Tascam PortaStudio 414 Mk II that I bought back in the ISSO days. It's a double-speed 4-track cassete thingie with Dolby and a 6 channel input mixer. Double-speed not dual speed, so it is used for making masters that must then be re-recorded on another deck at normal cassette speed to be played on regular cassette decks. Pretty much useless nowadays since a basic digital field recorder and mixer will do the same stuff but digitally and more noiselessly.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    It's worth noting that DAT is helical-scan, like videotape, not linear, like Philips cassette.

    Anyone remember the Telcan video recorder (as an extreme example of linear recording)?
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    I use it to communicate with ghosts.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021 edited
     
    Posted By: AsterixDicey transport mechanism, narrow multitrack tape (S/N ratio), slow tape speed etc. Would a studio professional be caught dead using it?

    Err, yes, well at least Back in the day when cassette was a thing, every studio had a cassette deck to dump a mix to.

    Maybe there were some 4-motor 3 head decks produced, but I'm not aware of any.


    In the later days with 'chrome' tape and a decent transport; it could sound pretty good. Like everything else in the audio chain, it is just a bucket of horrible compromises. The miracle is any of it sounds close to the original.

    It was cheap, simple, you could 'record' stuff (literally killing the industry). Extremely portable. If your player ate the tape - record a new one! What exactly was not to like?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021 edited
     
    Speaking of audio: does anybody have a sense of the longevity of CDs? I happened to visit Philips in Eindhoven just as they were finishing their development and was most impressed at the idea of recording on little dots read by a laser off a metallised disc. The Philips guys were most keen aboutthe prospective longevity of the record - they figured it would outlast paper. That hasn't really been my experience over the years. (Home recordings don't count of course - different medium). Have other people found commercial CDs to go bad?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    Early CDs, yes. particularly the ones that use a silver reflective layer, but generally because of failure in the lacquer coating.

    CD Bronzing

    Looks like shellac still wins.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    What surprised me about the Telcan idea was that in open-reel computer tape drives at the time, using vacuum columns and servo reels, 200 ips was still pretty extreme, even with 1.5 mil mylar substrate. HIgh-speed rewind could get to about 300 ips, however.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    Posted By: AsterixEarly CDs, yes. particularly the ones that use a silver reflective layer, but generally because of failure in the lacquer coating.

    CD Bronzing

    Looks like shellac still wins.


    I don't recall any bronze discolouration, only the appearance of little holes in the reflective layer and perhaps a sort of whitening around them, probably corrosion on the metal. This didn't happen in Canada but was quite a problem in the tropics.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021 edited
     
    I once bought a cheap Nakamichi Tape Deck and was not very pleased. A 900DM writeoff which I couldn't write off.

    But it looked nice.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: AsterixEarly CDs, yes. particularly the ones that use a silver reflective layer, but generally because of failure in the lacquer coating.

    CD Bronzing

    Looks like shellac still wins.


    I don't recall any bronze discolouration, only the appearance of little holes in the reflective layer and perhaps a sort of whitening around them, probably corrosion on the metal. This didn't happen in Canada but was quite a problem in the tropics.


    Check out the links in the bibliography at the end. All sorts of Disc Rot.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2021
     
    Posted By: aber0derI once bought a cheap Nakamichi Tape Deck and was not very pleased. A 900DM writeoff which I couldn't write off.

    But it looked nice.


    I think I've got a couple of BX-1 decks here somewhere. Don't know if they still work, though.