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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 16th 2016
     
    Posted By: AngusFifty years! How the time flies. Seems like yesterday I was sat in front of one.


    DD60 on a CDC 6000 series machine:



    1964, IIRC. This was the operator's console for the system. I spent far too much time in front of it. Text was 64 characters by 64 lines, all vector. Graphics was 512x512 pixels. No internal memory--the display was redrawn by a dedicated PPU. Pretty good for the time.
  1.  
    This might interest Angus more than Trim.
    http://www.seeker.com/jellyfish-lasers-are-revolutionizing-quantum-physics-2183865551.html
    It's very Trappian in any case.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2017
     
    I originally read that article in the New Scientist yokes ago, and decided death ray.

    NBF

    Air Force getting bids for defensive lasers on fighter jets.

    http://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/01/air-force-getting-bids-for-defensive.html
  2.  


    Defensive, not offensive. Riiiiiiiiiiiight.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2017
     
    Laser Defence - Chrome plate all jet fighters. ;)
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2017
     
    Fog.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2017
     
    Only fly on very cloudy days?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2017
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanThis might interest Angus more than Trim.
    http://www.seeker.com/jellyfish-lasers-are-revolutionizing-quantum-physics-2183865551.html
    It's very Trappian in any case.


    No, it's not really the first organic laser. For years dye lasers were used, based on compounds such as rhodamine 6G, which is a version of the organic compound xanthone, which in turn derives from material found in [drum roll] mangosteens. (You can start the aviation conspiracy theories now.)

    I'm not quite sure how this jellyfish protein ties in with polaritons, which are in my experience associated with thin layers of conductors. Anyway...
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2017
     
    It is called progress.
  3.  
    There's obviously a ton of useful and instructive stuff that Nature does at the biochemical level that is as yet undiscovered. Such is the massive complexity of the natural world - both plants and animals - that it will take us a long time to sort it all out.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2017
     
    Po

    Brits, Czechs claim world's most powerful 'super laser'.

    https://phys.org/news/2017-01-brits-czechs-world-powerful-super.html
  4.  
    Does not stack up against Lubin's claims. 20 tons and $48 M for 1 KW CW?
    Paying for 100 GW at those rates would be "challenging"
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2017
     
    Wot I've been saying.
  5.  
    Well you sort of have in a handwavey way. I haven't seen you take Lubin's actual figures for his fibre amplifiers and directly contradict his pricing. I believe they go up to about 1 KW too, but they are not 20 tons - they are the size of a paperback.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2017
     
    ++sigh++
  6.  
    I feel the same
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 26th 2017
     
    Now THERE is a far-out concept. It's hard to see how it could be a weapon or a defence unless the combatants are on opposite sides of the ionosphere.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2017
     
    Lockheed Martin to Deliver World Record-Setting 60kW Laser to U.S. Army.

    http://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/03/lockheed-martin-to-deliver-world-record.html
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2017
     
    So whatever happened to the megawatt X-ray laser promised Reagan for Star Wars?