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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2020
     
    Posted By: AngusYes, interesting. It would be nice to be able to hang around long enough to see if it works.


    Sie können natürlich jederzeit meiner Altersforschungspartei beitreten. Unsere Mitgliegsbeiträge sind zwar relativ hoch, aber wir haben einen dreimonatlichen newsletter.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2020
     
    Kann ich mich als experimentelles Opfer kostenlos anmelden?
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2020 edited
     
    Nein, leider nicht. Unser 'Rechtsstaat' hat diese Form von gottgegebener Freiheit leider regulatorisch wegobstrinert. (hoffentlich)

    (Bei meiner unnötigerweise konvoluten/kontortionalistischen Ausdrucksweise ist leider auch der Spellcheck wening hilfreich.)
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2020
     
    Then I'll pass.

    No, wait...that's not what I mean!
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Anton's stuff is OK, but that opening "Hellooo Wonderful Person" thing is enough to make you toss your breakfast.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    US team develops a rust-based radiation shielding technique.

    https://www.theengineer.co.uk/rust-based-radiation-shielding-technique/
  2.  
    Posted By: AngusAnton's stuff is OK, but that opening "Hellooo Wonderful Person" thing is enough to make you toss your breakfast.
    I find his vocal modulations highly annoying also. Slightly less so are those of John Michael Godier, who has this tendency to also do a strange rising quizzical noise at sentence end.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020 edited
     
    Why not just lie them flat on the ground? It's not as if empty acreage were at a premium on the moon.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    New transitive usage of "lie"?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Not new. Around here "lie" can be either transitive or intransitive when used in that sense. I suspect the UK people will agree. I always find the US use of "lay" to sound incorrect.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Before I haul out my OED and my magnifying glass to search, do you have a cite? I can find nothing online saying that "to lie" is transitive. I've been schooled to treat "lay" as the causative of "lie".
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020 edited
     
    Sorry - only usage. Maybe it's another thing I've got wrong all my life.

    ETA
    Maybe this is the answer:
    The verb "to lay" means to place something in a particular position. This most often means setting it down, perhaps on the ground or on a table. This verb is transitive, which means that it takes a direct object. In simple terms, "to lay" is an action you perform on something else. For example:

    Sarah lays the pencil on the table when she is done writing.

    Lay the vase gently on the table so we can fix the crack.

    Could you please lay the pillows back on the sofa?

    On the other hand, the verb "to lie" means to take on a recumbent position, typically stretched out on your back or side. This verb is intransitive, meaning that it does not take a direct object. It's usually an action people or animals perform on themselves. For example:

    I need to lie down and relax!

    You should lie flat on the floor to stretch your sore muscles.

    I am lying in bed with the baby because we aren't feeling well.


    I am using "lie" transitively in the sense of "to place something in a recumbent position". It is so used around here. And as I say, I think it may also be UK usage.

    "To lie that pole flat down on the floor"
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Prowling around the usual places I find that the internet grammar druids agree with asterix. It must be a local thing. I would make a distinction between

    Lay it down over there
    and
    Lie it down over there

    The distinction being that the first one means put it over there and the second means place it carefully flat over there.

    However, nobody agrees that the second version is grammatically correct.


    Anyone else have an opinion?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020 edited
     
    German "liegen" vs. "legen". Interestingly, "liegen" is an irregular strong verb, where "legen" is a regular weak critter.

    I suspect that Germans have the same difficulty as English speakers, but I can't prove it.
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    My dogs respond to either "lay down" or "lie down". When I am stressed I tend to say "lay down" (from the South Texish dialect) but in calmer times I speak English and say "lie down".
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Posted By: AngusProwling around the usual places I find that the internet grammar druids agree with asterix. It must be a local thing. I would make a distinction between

    Lay it down over there
    and
    Lie it down over there

    The distinction being that the first one means put it over there and the second means place it carefully flat over there.

    However, nobody agrees that the second version is grammatically correct.


    Anyone else have an opinion?
    Bricks get laid. So do ... erm...

    A bricklayer lays bricks, he doesn’t lie bricks down and cement them in place. The transitive use of lie is not uncommon here. It never felt right to me, so I generally avoided using it.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    My dogs lay down only if they've demolished one of the bed pillows.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Posted By: DuracellA bricklayer lays bricks, he doesn’t lie bricks down and cement them in place. The transitive use of lie is not uncommon here. It never felt right to me, so I generally avoided using it.


    Aha. Some semblance of a similar usage elsewhere.
    To me a bricklayer would lay, not lie bricks because the element of cautious care is missing. I would also lay a canvas down flat on the ground. But I would carefully lie a fine porcelain tile right beside it.