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  1.  
    Those clowns even lost that option well before they actually hit the water.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2019 edited
     
    I appreciate Al's explanation about how pilots train. I don't agree about not flying commercial. Despite everything, most commercial airplanes get where they intended to go in one piece and land on a runway. Events like the above and like the 737-Max are (very fortunately) unusual aberrations. I don't recall ever feeling unsafe in an airliner. Not that I would necessarily have known what was going on. But I have felt unsafe in light planes, for example in an unmonitored "VFR corridor" with willy nilly traffic and in an Army Beaver in rain and fog on a GCA approach where the controller kept telling the pilot to pull up. Oh and also, a long time ago, in a UH-1D Huey "herding cows" off a firing range when a whole bunch of caution lights came on at once due to a violent pull up to avoid hitting one of the cows.

    BTW, I just scored a cute gadget on eBay just to play with. It's a Zaon Flight Systems PCAS MRX anticollision device. It's tiny and it works! The company apparently went out of business due to ADS-B but a lot of pilots still use it or want one and there is a brisk market in used ones on eBay. I don't fly on general aviation airplanes often enough to justify having it but it's fun to play with until I finally turn it loose again on eBay.

    http://mauldinaviation.com/Documents_files/MRX%20Manual%202.9.pdf
  2.  
    I felt unsafe in a commercial plane once. But I was 19 and the stewardess was chasing me with a plastic fork. So unsafe in a nice way.
  3.  
    The airliner builders and the airlines themselves, along with the FAA, NTSB, and the ATC system do their very best to hide the unsafe bits from the users of the system. But the deeper into any particular area one delves, the more and more unsafe bits one digs up.

    I worked in a GA engine overhaul facility, doing zero-time overhauls of the Continental and Lycoming piston engines that keep General Aviation flying. Of course we replaced all consumables when o/h an engine, like gaskets, seals, and lockwashers. The buildup mechanics suddenly started breaking a lot of lockwashers. The lockwashers (internal and external star types) could not take the specified torque on the fastener and would split out or just crumble. It turned out after investigation that there was an incredible lot of fake aircraft hardware suddenly in the system, origin you-know-where. Not just lockwashers either. How about a Grade 8 marked bolt that strips its threads when tightened? Or simply shears in two. Or even scarier ... makes it through the buildup process and onto an actually aviating aircraft, to fail at some undetermined time in the future.

    Do you think this problem ever made it into the consciousnesses of the typical air travel system user? I don't.

    That's just a single example from my own experience. How about a transpacific flight in a 747 full to the gills with people, on short final for landing Honolulu after a many hours long flight, in fact almost in the flare, when someone taxis out onto the runway and we have to go around. Tremendously unsafe in a dozen ways. Or how about lining up for landing at SFO at night... only mistaking the taxiway full of other airplanes for the runway, and only having a few meters of vertical clearance when finally going around....

    Sure, like I said, safe as houses. But when my house crashes, four hundred other people are also not going to die.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2019
     
    Making a case for returning airships to the skies.


    https://revolution-green.com/making-case-returning-airships-skies/

    I like the idea of transporting hydrogen.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2019
     
    "To address the risk of combustion of the hydrogen in the airship, the authors suggest automating the operation, loading, and unloading of hydrogen airships and designing flightpaths that avoid cities to reduce the risk of fatalities in the event of an accident."

    Or in other words, there is fuck all we can do to stop them blowing themselves to bits every so often, we just make sure to keep then out of the way of people.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2019
     
    Well, you could have outer cells of helium, but that makes it more expensive.
  4.  
    And yet we self-dispense a highly flammable and volatile liquid with high vapour pressure, toxic fumes, hazardous on skin contact, contains carcinogens and gawd knows what else, into crashprone metal boxes, whose tank for said hazardous chemical mixture is generally right there close to the road and the fenders (wings in the uk) of said speeding vehickle.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2019
     
    The trouble is can you imagine Angus and his long range incendiary rifle and a nice big target comes floating along or even Andrew and his powerful laser sees a large bloated UFO when he comes back from the pub, even very nice me may want to see what happens when a drone hits it.
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2019 edited
     
    nanokevlargraphene ripstop gingham outer envelope coated with highly reflective anti-stealth coating
    internal gasbags made of that same stuff they package scissors in at the WallWart, or spun fibres from recycled pop bottles
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2019
     
    Did you use that to stay hidden in your high school girls shower room?
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2019
     
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2019
     
    I don't care.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2019 edited
     
    Space case command and Mike Pence wet dream, the BAE Tempest. Sort of a word salad airplane:

    Tempest will be able to fly unmanned, and use swarming technology to control drones. It will incorporate artificial intelligence deep learning and possess directed-energy weapons.[9][10] Another piece of technology being designed into Tempest is so-called Cooperative Engagement Capability, the ability to cooperate on the battlefield, sharing sensor data and messages to coordinate attack or defence.[6] Tempest will feature an adaptive cycle engine and a virtual cockpit shown on a pilot's helmet-mounted display.[11]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BAE_Systems_Tempest
    -Wikipedia
  5.  
    I think SkyNet had some of those
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2019
     
    A consortium including British Airways and Shell is hoping to build Europe’s first waste-to-jet-fuel plant at Immingham in North East Lincolnshire.

    https://www.theengineer.co.uk/waste-jet-fuel-humber/
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2019
     
    And Trim wants to be first to poop in their contributions tank.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 23rd 2019
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2019
     
    KITTY HAWK’S EXTREMELY QUIET FLYING CAR HAS A 100-MILE RANGE.

    https://futurism.com/the-byte/kitty-hawk-flying-car-heaviside
  6.  
    If it's "EXTREMELY QUIET", why are you shouting?