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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: maryyugoThis is a badly handled Martin 242


    Ouch! I watched until they dumped it in the surf. As far as I could tell it wasn't being handled at all.

    ETA Now I have read your explanation, and that does seem right. I once had a 19 footer with a partial rig, and she was essentially useless close hauled in anything over 20kt, and definitely useless on the jib alone.

    Other things that seem pretty obvious mistakes are. 1 going out in more wind than you can handle. 2. taking too many people who don't know what they are doing. 3. Not having a reliable motor - I am assuming they couldn't bring her into the wind, clean the mess up, and go home; and therefore that they had no power.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019
     
    Posted By: maryyugoSome amazing places you can take a helicopter.


    Welcome to British Columbia.
  1.  
    Too much sailboat, not enough sailor?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019 edited
     
    Too much wind (Force 5 maybe? "Fresh Breeze"). Not enough boat eeyore sailor.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019
     
  2.  
    Posted By: AngusWhat is it with Redondo beach?


    That's amazing.

    Spoiler alert: I thought the thing was going to be completely broken up or tossed way up, but then suddenly it sails off the rocks -- of course while the camera is panned away? What happened here? Mighty tough boat to take that kind of pounding and still stay in one piece without any big holes.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019 edited
     
    I think they managed to fire a line to it somehow. But I admit it's hard to see what happened. Also, why did they pay no attention to the people in the water?

    ETA Upon a second viewing I think those two issues are related. The person in the water seems to be wearing a wet suit, so I assume he carried the line to the boat. The camera pans away at the critical moment.

    And it didn't sail off. There is no power in the jib and almost none in the mainsail, and it doesn't head up the way it would.
  3.  
    Did they winch it in? Because there at the end it almost looks like it's ready to collide with one of the rescue boats. Some of the commenters seem to think it wasn't pulled off but did sail off in a favourable gust of wind. Seems rather impossible to me, but when and how was any line attached?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019
     
    It's hard to see what happened. I guess sailing off is really no more impossible than getting a line on it.

    Miracle?
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      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019
     
    I think it's being winched to the farther boat, and may be tied to both boats (see 3:55). And there are times when I think I see a line.

    Al should be good at seeing hidden lines, given his experience in detecting fishing lines in OU machines.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2019 edited
     
    Both boats would make sense- the other one pulling upwind a bit. If you could organise it. It's just that I can't fathom (heh) how they attached a line at the bow. Grapnel?
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2019 edited
     
    Are you guys looking at this on "phones"? A Harbor Patrol/lifeguard person jumps into the water with a red float and swims the line over. He goes over the side at about 02:05. That was brave and I have to assume it was more to rescue the people than to save the boat. The boat is an S2 and it apparently survived the event although the rudder definitaly didn't buff out. I misplaced the link to the aftermath but here is an article about the rescue:

    http://tbrnews.com/news/redondo_beach/two-men-dog-rescued-in-redondo-beach-sailing-accident/article_7636ee0e-ffc7-11e7-b500-37b82a8c3dc5.html
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2019 edited
     
    Aha! Justified!

    But it still doesn't tell me how he attached the line.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2019
     
    With his new false teeth?
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2019 edited
     
    But it still doesn't tell me how he attached the line.


    You're right, Ang'. Looking very carefully on a large screen, I see the Coastie jumping into the water and swimming to the boat and then standing off 30 feet or so, probably to avoid a risk of getting squished or thrown on the rocks himself. The boat turns on its own towards the water and downwind which fills the mainsail and then someone aboard has the presence of mind with their by then mixmastered brains, to haul in the mainsheet. The boat sails off on it's own but makes very slow headway because, it turns out from another article, the rudder shaft is bent 90 degrees and the rudder is up against the bottom and acting as a speed brake.

    If I run into the other article again, I'll post it but it's been elusive at the moment. Anyway, nobody passed any lines. In fact, at the end, you can see one of the crew on the foredeck, trying to prepare the bowline presumably to be towed.

    ETA: actually, this should do:

    Finally, there was a lull in the swells and Currie using what he termed "colorful language" instructed them to get in the water that instant. One of the men abide while the other stayed with the dog.

    “He looked at me with these big eyes and jumped off the boat,” Currie said.

    Just at that moment, the boat swung to the left and with the mainsail still fastened began to sail off the rocks.

    “When the boat came off and started to turn, my biggest concern once we have a loose boat is about what happens if it turns to its right. Then I'm stuck between the rocks and the boat,” Currie said. “I was just swimming as hard as I could to get away from that boat.”


    http://tbrnews.com/news/redondo_beach/two-men-dog-rescued-in-redondo-beach-sailing-accident/article_7636ee0e-ffc7-11e7-b500-37b82a8c3dc5.html
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2019
     
    This is the article I was looking for in "Sailing Anarchy" - a pretty brutal online sailing journal. Scroll down for photos of the aftermath and the boat out of the water. See the remains of the rudder. Ouch! Tough boat though. Easily repairable, all of it.

    http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?/topic/183083-twilight-race-boat-capsizes-and-hits-king-harbor-pier/&page=4

    They also discuss the other incident involving the Martin 242.
  4.  
    I watched it again... at one point the boat is completely out of the water, up on the rocks. You can see the entire keel! The next swell picks it up off the rocks again.

    That is amazing. How is that thing not reduced to a bundle of torn fiberglass and kindling?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2019
     
    GRP boats are surprisingly tough. My son had a Westerly, built in the '70s before they started cutting down on the laminate thickness. It was a tank! Slow, but you couldn't damage it with an axe.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2019
     
    A Dozen Mystery Objects Suddenly Popped Out Of Hangars At Tonopah Test Range Airport

    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/31429/a-dozen-mystery-objects-suddenly-popped-out-of-hangars-at-tonopah-test-range-airport
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2020 edited
     
    Something that Angus might enjoy

    From the Mulroney days.