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  1.  
    Bad week for aviation. MD83 down in Mali last night. Weather? Probably too high for it to have been a MANPAD shootdown by one of the several conflict-associations partying down below.



    No photos of the crash site yet, 116 souls on board.
  2.  
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2014 edited
     
    That seems trivially obvious and also unimportant. Clearly drag goes roughly as area while payload roughly as volume. But why would a large body be more efficient to feed? A huge biomass of bacteria want to know - they always thought that feeding involved transport across cell membranes: i.e. a small body with a large area would work well.

    As for airplanes, somebody has to bring all those passengers to the airport. Would that be feeder airlines flying many more Dash-8 s and suchlike, which might be considered to be a more successful species given that they outnumber the jumbi?
  3.  
    It would be nicely convenient to have such a well-integrated system in place. Yes, like the body of an organism. Think of Tahiti, press a button, and all necessary arrangements are made
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2014
     
    It's more or less in place, at least by comparison with Captain Cook's travel arrangements.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2014
     
    Posted By: AngusThat seems trivially obvious and also unimportant. Clearly drag goes roughly as area while payload roughly as volume. But why would a large body be more efficient to feed? A huge biomass of bacteria want to know - they always thought that feeding involved transport across cell membranes: i.e. a small body with a large area would work well.

    As for airplanes, somebody has to bring all those passengers to the airport. Would that be feeder airlines flying many more Dash-8 s and suchlike, which might be considered to be a more successful species given that they outnumber the jumbi?


    Was there ever a less aptly named aeroplane than the "Dash" 8? Not for some time, anyway.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2014
     
    It's a STOL design - not intended for racing. The name is an attempt at pronouncing the designation of its predecessor, the DeHavilland Canada DHC-7 thus "Dash-7".

    It's a very successful design, like its predecessor, the Twin Otter. If you're in a hurry, take a mule.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: AngusIt's a STOL design - not intended for racing. The name is an attempt at pronouncing the designation of its predecessor, the DeHavilland Canada DHC-7 thus "Dash-7".

    It's a very successful design, like its predecessor, the Twin Otter. If you're in a hurry, take a mule.


    I would, but they don't fly mules to the Australian Capital Territory, only the slow, noisy, bumpy old Dash 8's.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: loremanbumpy




    I suspect that is your Australian air, not the aircraft.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: loremanbumpy




    I suspect that is your Australian air, not the aircraft.


    The Saab doesn't bump as much.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014 edited
     
    How can you tell unless they are flying through the same air?

    I don't know the Saab, but apparently not everybody agrees with you.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: AngusHow can you tell unless they are flying through the same air?

    I don't know the Saab, but apparentlynot everybodyagrees with you.


    Well I think that's pretty equivocal. I've flown a lot in both and much preferred the Saab when there were a lot of them around. These days, different routes and the Saab is out of production, so I don't get much choice. Anyway, the A380 has about the smoothest, quitest ride of the lot (apart from the BAE 146-200, but you don't see many of those around anymore either), but they don't fly those to Canberra.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014 edited
     
    The BAE 146 - haven't seen one for years. I remember they made such a row when the wheels went down that the crew used to warn the passengers not to panic.

    No-I think it was the flaps, not the wheels. High-wing design, so air hitting the fuselage.
  4.  
    in large friendly letters on the front
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    The Fairchild Metro was also a fairly horrible "commuter" aeroplane that I used to fly in a fair bit. Noisy and very, very cramped.
  5.  
    The thing that makes an aeroplane fly smoothly through rough air is mostly the stiffness of the wing. Secondarily it is the response of the aircraft's control system manager to the attitude upsets caused by the turbulence. This is why the A380 and its ilk are smooth flyers in rough air. They are so damned heavy that it takes quite a bump to change their velocity vector, the wings are so flexible they are like spring shock absorbers, and the control system automagically compensates for upsets and acts as an active damper for the wing "shock absorbers".
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinThe thing that makes an aeroplane fly smoothly through rough air is mostly the stiffness of the wing. Secondarily it is the response of the aircraft's control system manager to the attitude upsets caused by the turbulence. This is why the A380 and its ilk are smooth flyers in rough air. They are so damned heavy that it takes quite a bump to change their velocity vector, the wings are so flexible they are like spring shock absorbers, and the control system automagically compensates for upsets and acts as an active damper for the wing "shock absorbers".


    Yep. Much better than a Beechcraft if you want to read a book or do the crossword puzzle.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    For loreman's comfort we must design a huge enormous brick that slithers through the air on great flappy plastic plates, with a Cray to run the autopilot finite element programme.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2014
     
    Posted By: AngusFor loreman's comfort we must design a huge enormous brick that slithers through the air on great flappy plastic plates, with a Cray to run the autopilot finite element programme.


    Nah, I quite like the 777, it'll do.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 10th 2014 edited
     


    An-140 in Tehran, at least 40 dead. On climbout from Mehrabad, possible structural failure?