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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinWords fail.



    Never forget that the only thing you can add to a plane to make it lighter is holes. Another law of design is that with enough power, anything will fly. Even straight up. I like that you can reach the propeller from the cockpit. Very handy when you need to slice carrots.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2017
     
    I wonder what Al thinks of the recent speech by the Orange Menace, AKA the President, about air traffic control "privatization." What I got out of it is our current system is very very bad and nothing in it whatever has changed since the 1960's. Airplanes are only tracked on pieces of scrap paper passed around between controllers. Also, the new system would rely on GPS and would be very very good. And all of this is new and invented entirely by one of his appointees (I forget which) working with a pencil on the back of an envelope while waiting on a hot tarmac for existing air traffic controllers to get his or her plane moving great again.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/06/05/donald-trump-air-traffic-control/102510732/

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielreed/2017/04/19/the-white-houses-hyping-of-air-traffic-control-privatization-modernization-hurts-the-cause/#678e954740a3

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2017/06/04/trump-to-privatise-air-traffic-control-why-not-you-get-all-future-profits-now-when-you-sell/#2dae980d5f13
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2017
     
    Trump to reinvent air traffic control? Yet another reason to endeavour to avoid having to fly anywhere ...
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    Sure. Privatize everything, and let the contracts go to the lowest bidders. What could possibly go wrong?
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    Socialism could die.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2017
     
    Lockheed Martin's Skunk Works recently divulged some information about the SR-72 program to build a successor to the iconic SR-71 Blackbird reconnaissance aircraft. The advanced aircraft development division of Lockheed Martin told Aviation Week that hypersonic technologies, including a combined cycle propulsion system that merges a supersonic jet engine with a rocket engine, have advanced to the point that work on the planned SR-72 can begin in earnest. On paper, the SR-72 will be a strike and reconnaissance aircraft capable of topping Mach 6.


    http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a26796/hypersonic-sr-72-aircraft/
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    Quit pushing those pedals and have a lie down https://twitter.com/YoufeckingIdiot/status/874517377895075841/video/1
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2017
     
    I believe these fly, sort of, on one engine. Apparently, not this one.


    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-plane-crash-405-freeway-20170630-story.html
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    A 310 with 2 souls on board should have been able to return safely, I think, unless they had a piano in the back or something. We don't know the circumstances that may have prevented the pilot from being able to do so, and I hope the two people are going to be all right.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2017
     
    I heard the audio and the pilot sounded freaked out. The aircraft had just taken off maybe with mucho fuel. This video shows the crash.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/six-passenger-aircraft-crashes-405-freeway-n778646

    If you look carefully, the gear is just being extended as the plane enters the frame and then shortly after, it stalls and falls like a rock. The tower conversation included the pilot sayingg he would keep the gear up as long as possible to try to "gain altitude". Maybe he turned back to the runway too enthusiastically -- I have heard this is a cause of crashes in twins on one engine but Al would know much more than aye.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2017
     
    I was pretty sure I had read about this, which is no substitute for experience or formal training but for what it's worth, here it is:

    https://www.pilotworkshop.com/tips/engine_failure_takeoff.htm

    I was going to look specifically how this issue applies to light twins (I remember that single engine failure is very serious in a light twin with a full fuel load) but I don't have time.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2017 edited
     
    Some people are downplaying the severity of that incident, saying that the pilots would have been able to see out the windows and know that there were obstacles in the landing path and would have made the decision to go around themselves rather than waiting for the tower to tell them about it. Those people seem to have forgotten the Asiana Flight 214, a B777 that was crashed into the seawall at the same airport, by pilots who should have been looking out the window and flying the damned airplane -- but weren't.

    It does take a few seconds from the time somebody hits the TOGA button before the airplane actually starts climbing out. This was a narrowly averted disaster, no doubt in my mind about it. I imagine the pilots are probably not going to be pilots for very much longer.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2017
     
    I still don't understand how you can fly an approach to a taxiway with all the lighting showing the path to the runway.
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    Well, see, you are thinking in terms of looking out the window and flying the airplane. Too many modern airline pilots are "children of the magenta line" and are letting the automation do the flying while they watch needles and gauges and big fancy glass displays instead of looking outside. Still, you'd think that they would have noticed a horizontal offset from the centerline of the glideslope. Could some kind of navigational equipment malfunction have caused the pilots to be ... er... misled?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2017
     
    That's been suggested. But looking out the window should be part of an instrument scan, Shirley...particularly on final approach.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinThis was a narrowly averted disaster, no doubt in my mind about it. I imagine the pilots are probably not going to be pilots for very much longer.
    Indeed. Terrifying. The ATC conversations were on a news station. It seemed a very close call. Many hundreds of people would have been crushed and incinerated.

    As for looking out the window, I suppose... but you don't get much time to see stuff if it's an ILS approach at minimums. Looks like the self-driving airplane did an oops.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2017
     
    To their credit, the pilots did spot the problem. The question is how they got into it in the first place.
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    Posted By: maryyugoAs for looking out the window, I suppose... but you don't get much time to see stuff if it's an ILS approach at minimums.
    Are they forced to wear blindfolds up to a certain point?