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  1.  
    The world still awaits that talented materials scientist to pave the way to volume production of some graphene-based product
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeOct 14th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2017
     
    Experimental Slat Plane! Unstallable wing?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WH8kCTzy91A
  2.  
    Nothing that flies is unstallable.

    Meanwhile... 178 seconds to live...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7t4IR-3mSo
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin[div class=CommentHeader][span][/span][/div][div class=CommentBody id=CommentBody_1900524]Nothing that flies is unstallable.[/div]


    A helium-filled weather balloon?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017
     
    It doesn't fly. It floats.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinNothing that flies is unstallable.

    Meanwhile... 178 seconds to live...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7t4IR-3mSo
    Man was not made to fly. If God had meant man to fly, He would have given him wings.

    Meanwhile, a little radio trouble goes a long ways:


    https://www.flyingmag.com/air-canada-flight-ignores-go-around-calls-at-sfo
  3.  
    ATC comms from the two recent Air Canada incidents at SFO:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXNWwKx9c1o

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW-ETmZU0u8
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017
     
    Posted By: AngusIt doesn't fly. It floats.


    Picky, picky. A dirigible flies and floats.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017
     
    Which dirigible does that? If it is supported by Bernoulli effect, it flies. If it is supported by displacement, it floats.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinATC comms from the two recent Air Canada incidents at SFO:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXNWwKx9c1o
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW-ETmZU0u8


    Clearly, we need self-flying planes!

    About that classic 178 second video:

    I am not a licensed pilot though I've been around aircraft and have flown quite a bit in various types of flying things for work stuff and took some lessons many years ago. But it's easy to learn how simple it is to kill yourself, with any flight simulator, even the Microsoft one on your PC. Just turn on thick clouds and a bit of weather and turn off the wing leveler and the autopilot. Without IFR training and plenty of practice, you most likely won't last long in one piece. Anyway, I didn't.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeNov 11th 2017 edited
     
    And then you have to add in the effects of vertigo. The "seat of your pants" is telling you one thing (wrong) and it is different from what the artificial horizon, airspeed, VSI and T/B indicator are telling you (right). When your senses are telling you that you are straight and level but the instruments are informing you of the spiral dive ... it takes real discipline and training -- and sufficient altitude -- to be able to make the appropriate corrections to get back in control.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    It happened to my son one dark December night in his Cessna 175, when be was young and foolish. He managed to recover and now flies medivac services for the BC government, with considerably more circumspection. No old, bold pilots, they say.

    I still shudder.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    As for flying dirigibles, one should note that there have been some hybrid airships using both flotation and aerodynamic lift.

    It reminds me of a story I once heard about Brunel's Great Eastern. Apparently it had both a capstan and a steam engine to lift the anchor. The design problem was that both were needed to get it up. One day of course the steam engine quit and quite a few injuries and deaths resulted. It must have been really nasty if the capstan bars were duly swifted.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinAnd then you have to add in the effects of vertigo. The "seat of your pants" is telling you one thing (wrong) and it is different from what the artificial horizon, airspeed, VSI and T/B indicator are telling you (right). When your senses are telling you that you are straight and level but the instruments are informing you of the spiral dive ... it takes real discipline and training -- and sufficient altitude -- to be able to make the appropriate corrections to get back in control.


    Now that you mention it, a bad scene happened to someone I knew many years ago in an F-14 climbing out of Miramar NAS in wind and clouds at night. He was also somewhat fatigued. He said he kept thinking he was climbing too fast, banking and turning based on how it felt. I forget the exact anecdote but I remember him saying he fought the sensations and focused on the instruments yet did not gain altitude as assigned until he broke out of the clouds and he was quite shaken by the whole thing. And this was an experienced carrier pilot.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusWhich dirigible does that? If it is supported by Bernoulli effect, it flies. If it is supported by displacement, it floats.


    Consider the WikiP article on Zeppelins. How many times is "flight" and "flown" used? If it's a flight, it flies.

    Nobody talks about taking a flight on a boat, unless it's a very strange boat, such as a Curtiss NC-3.
  4.  
    Try flying a zeppelin without aid of flotation. Try floating a zeppelin without aid of Bernoulli. Which is the more successful?

    Zepps and blimps have aerodynamic control surfaces. These can be stalled, producing more drag than lift, if their critical angle of attack is exceeded.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinZepps and blimps have aerodynamic control surfaces. These can be stalled, producing more drag than lift, if their critical angle of attack is exceeded.


    I had in fact considered that, but in contrast with flying machines, stalling the control surfaces of an aerostat doesn't generally cause it to fall out of the sky.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: AsterixHow many times is "flight" and "flown" used? If it's a flight, it flies.


    Oh yeah? Does a flight of arrows fly? How about a flight of fancy?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: AsterixNobody talks about taking a flight on a boat,


    Missed that. I rest my case. Flotation isn't flying.