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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    I think flying is just moving through the air. A stone flies if I throw it, right?
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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     
    Or a flight of stairs?

    Does a rocket fly? It doesn't employ the Bernoulli effect.
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    Rockets rocket.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     


    Does rocket rocket?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: maryyugoI think flying is just moving through the air. A stone flies if I throw it, right?


    Only in a metaphorical sense. It follows a ballistic trajectory, energy losses ignored.

    Or is this poetry we are talking about?
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: Asterix

    Does rocket rocket?
    Arugula?
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    The Flight of Fancy
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     
    Do stairs fly?

    ETA
    Oh. I see that Asterix and I are making opposite points with the same example.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Merriam Webster's first definition, which corresponds to the rational engineering sense

    To move through the air by means of wings or winglike parts.

    They also list some poetic, metaphorical, airy-fairy secondary meanings.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    What about the Canadian Coanda flying saucer?

    Didn't have wings or winglets it used the Coanda effect.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusMerriam Webster's first definition, which corresponds to the rational engineering sense

    To move through the air by means of wings or winglike parts.

    They also list some poetic, metaphorical, airy-fairy secondary meanings.


    So rockets (and missiles in general) don't fly. So when you're hit by a cannonball flying through the air, it isn't flying.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Which depends on Bernoulli effect.
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    Then there's the old adage, "Anything will fly if you throw it hard enough."

    Emirates gives its modern form: "Anything can fly if you spend enough money on it."
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: Asterix
    Posted By: AngusMerriam Webster's first definition, which corresponds to the rational engineering sense

    To move through the air by means of wings or winglike parts.

    They also list some poetic, metaphorical, airy-fairy secondary meanings.


    So rockets (and missiles in general) don't fly. So when you're hit by a cannonball flying through the air, it isn't flying.



    Merriam-Webster allows it. I say it is unworthy.

    Is a rocket flying when operating in the absence of air?
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    There is always some gas somewhere.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2017
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Is a rocket flying when operating in the absence of air?


    Just struggling to point out, in my own inept way, that there are differences in common and scientific speech.

    But I'm unaware of a commonly-used scientific term for a vehicle or projectile that owes its lift from the Bernoulli effect.