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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: maryyugoYikes, that's 1670 feet per minute. They might achieve orbit.

    BTW, is the air speed indicator mounted weird? I looks like zero is at nine oclock so maybe they mounted it differently than usual or I am seeing it wrong somehow.

    It looks like it's a "turn-and-a-half" indicator, since precise airspeed control over a fairly wide range (albeit low) is critical to sailplane performance. Also frequently used on helicopters, I understand.

    One type:
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    Metric:
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2017
     
    Many thanks.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeDec 25th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018 edited
     
    The pilot in this is reported as a Canadian here. The aircraft certainly is. An oldie but a goodie. I fly in the turbo-ised version fairly often. They are mainstays of the floatplane industry around VI.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusThe pilot inthisis reported as a Canadian here. The aircraft certainly is. An oldie but a goodie. I fly in the turbo-ised version fairly often. They are mainstays of the floatplane industry around VI.


    I've flown a few times in an original Beaver with radial engine. While that engine isn't particularly reliable, the plane will glide so in the event of an engine failure, you have a chance. I was aboard an Army Beaver and the engine quit about 5000 feet over trees over Southern Alabama. We did have parachutes and my boss who was a skydiver, was eager to jump out but it was night and there was fog on the ground so it seemed best to wait till the last minute. The engine restarted and we arrived safely to our destination (Pensacola NAS). The engine was examined and nothing was found so the cause was tentatively assigned to carburetor ice.

    Of course, none of that is a factor in the Turbo-Beaver. It should be as reliable as the Pilatus. But I always worry flying in a single engine aircraft. It is so nice to have a spare engine if you should need it.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018
     
    Posted By: AngusThe pilot inthisis reported as a Canadian here. The aircraft certainly is. An oldie but a goodie. I fly in the turbo-ised version fairly often. They are mainstays of the floatplane industry around VI.


    Happened just down the road from my place (no, really). I suspect the finding will be pilot error
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018
     
    Naturally , since he can't argue.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018
     
    I see those planes most days taking off and landing in the harbour and flying over my place on the weekends. They do some pretty flashy flying, with low level tight turns and very close formations when there's more than one of them, no doubt to give the punters a bit of a thrill. The reports say the plane may have attempted a low level tight right turn shortly after take-off. I believe carbureted Beavers are a bit prone to stalling during such manoeuvres.
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    Posted By: maryyugoIt is so nice to have a spare engine if you should need it.
    With two engines you have twice the probability of an engine failure. But you do have more choices of your crash site.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2018
     
    Slightly. I know a few twin aircraft that become essentially unmanageable if they lose one engine on takeoff.
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    Posted By: alsetalokinWith two engines you have twice the probability of an engine failure. But you do have more choices of your crash site.
    One hundred engines would be automatically fatal, therefore.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
     
    Very likely.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2018
     
    Rats. Flying Sunwings to YYZ on Sunday. Hope they have another aircraft.
    • CommentAuthorNick Hawk
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2018 edited
     
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2018
     
    Posted By: Nick HawkRunway excursion incident
    Saw that this morning. More life a precipice excursion.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2018 edited
     
    That's pretty amazing. Supposedly the right engine produced some "uncommanded" thrust during the rollout which drove them off the pavement.



    Could have been much much worse. Can you imagine the difficulty of fighting a fire in that position, or even worse had it slid further down the slope...

    What a view that must have been from the cockpit, as the nose went out over the precipice...

    (Note the location of the right engine... in the water...)
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    Now the story is that the aircraft was dispatched with the RH thrust reverser inop. Hmmm.....
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2018
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinNow the story is that the aircraft was dispatched with the RH thrust reverser inop. Hmmm.....


    Just curious... can you check those before flight? (Do they normally?)
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    Yes. Certain equipment failures are allowable, such as a single inop TR on certain ac types.