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    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018
     
    Posted By: TrimA non gay Australian well I never how did you work out he was gay then?

    Or did he behave just like Andrew?


    It was just an intuition I had based upon his general mien Trim. Do you get the same feeling about Andrew?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018
     
    Posted By: loremanIt was just an intuition I had based upon his general mien Trim.


    Sounds like a senior guy in the Vietnamese Army.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018
     
    One you trained?
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018
     
    Posted By: loreman
    Posted By: TrimA non gay Australian well I never how did you work out he was gay then?

    Or did he behave just like Andrew?


    It was just an intuition I had based upon his general mien Trim. Do you get the same feeling about Andrew?


    Don't tell him I told you this but he went to Oxford University and he hails from the midlands, enough said?
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018
     
    Not so uncommon. The Mitsubishi MU-2 has only spoilers, no ailerons at all!
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2018 edited
     
    I once flew a glider that used "spoilerons" for roll control. (J-4 Javelin)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peterson_J-4_Javelin
    It was weird. No adverse aileron yaw, which can be a slight problem in long-winged, aileron-equipped gliders, but instead of rolling about the fuselage's longitudinal axis, it rolled about the opposite wingtip. So every time one applies a roll input on the stick, the fuselage drops several feet. I suppose the pilot eventually gets used to it, but still...

    And there are several large aircraft that use spoilers for roll control, like the C-17 and B-52g for instance.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9R0GzIsDlI
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2018
     
    Posted By: AngusNot so uncommon.The Mitsubishi MU-2 has only spoilers, no ailerons at all!


    There is one of these at the local airport, KMYF. Beautiful little airplane said to fly more like a jet than a turboprop. But for some reason, it has accumulated a horrible safety record.

    The MU-2B has been a dream-machine for the plaintiffs' bar for several

    years. Of the 800 or so aircraft that were built between 1967 and 1985, more

    than 200 have been involved in incidents or accidents, according to NTSB

    statistics. The accident rate was particularly bad in 2004 and 2005, with a

    dozen-plus crashes and 13 fatalities. Overall, its five-year accident rate

    from 2000 to 2004 was 3.17 per 100,000 flight hours, compared to 1.73

    accidents per 100,000 flight hours for that time frame among other popular

    turboprops, according to Robert E. Breiling Associates. During the same

    five-year period, the Mitsubishi's fatal accident rate was 1.66 per 100,000

    flight hours, or more than triple that of popular turboprops, Breiling

    asserts. Since the airplane's entry into service 37 years ago, more than 200

    people have been killed in MU-2 accidents, trial lawyers say. Those

    statistics also focused the attention of the FAA on the aircraft. About 400

    MU-2B aircraft are still in active service.

    To understand how that history impacts fleet values, see this month's

    20/Twenty on page 112.


    http://www.iasa.com.au/folders/Safety_Issues/FAA_Inaction/whatswrongwithMU2.html


    A full 25% of the aircraft built have encountered "incidents or accidents."

    Maybe not the best ride to choose. Probably NOT because of the use of spoilers rather than ailerons.
  1.  
    Like all aircraft they are reasonably safe until the engines start.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2018
     
    Ha!
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2018 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2018
     
    ... and she died.

    I was pondering this last night, and I can only remember two other engine failures like this. United flight 232 in 1989 (111 killed), and that A380 that landed safely in Sydney in 2010. A quick perusal of Wikipedia showed a cluster of such failures in the past few years, including another A380.

    I guess the others didn't make such a splash in the news because they happened on the ground.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2018
     
    What engine did it have, the Rolls-Royce Trent 900 or the Engine Alliance GP7000?
  2.  
    Neither.

    The engine that blew on Southwest Flight 1380 was made by CFM International, a joint venture of GE and the French company Safran Aircraft Engines.

    In a statement on Tuesday, CFM said that it has sent a team of technical representatives to the site of the emergency landing to help the National Transportation Safety Board investigate. The company said it couldn't share any information or details about the accident.

    GE and Safran "will make every resource necessary available to ensure support," CFM said.

    CFM said that the engine was a model CFM56-7B. That model has "compiled an outstanding safety and reliability record since entering revenues service in 1997 while powering more than 6,700 aircraft worldwide," the company said. "The engine has accumulated more than 350 million flight hours as one of the most reliable and popular jet engine in airline history."


    https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/southwest-flight-emergency/
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2018 edited
     
    Posted By: korkskrewI was pondering this last night, and I can only remember two other engine failures like this. United flight 232 in 1989 (111 killed), and that A380 that landed safely in Sydney in 2010. A quick perusal of Wikipedia showed a cluster of such failures in the past few years, including another A380.


    SW had an identical-appearing failure... same aircraft type (different airplane), same engine position, same result except no perforation of fuselage and no injuries... and that was two years ago.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2018
     
    SW1380 cabin audio during engine emergency. I want her to be my pilot. https://youtu.be/FkVTdvcghHc
    •  
      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2018 edited
     
    "We're going to stop right here by this fire truck. Good day all".
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2018 edited
     
    Navy pilots are something else--a breed apart.

    Back in the days of the Moffet Field air show, the Blue Angels practiced their maneuvers in the week before the show. My house was right under the flight path. Those pilots had to have ice water in their veins.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2018 edited
     
    Posted By: pcstru"We're going to stop right here by this fire truck. Good day all".


    I don't want to minimize this pilot's coolness under fire but what did you expect from her? Wailing? This sort of behavior is wonderful but should be expected from any experienced airline pilot.

    Posted By: AsterixBack in the days of the Moffet Field air show, the Blue Angels practiced their maneuvers in the week before the show. My house was right under the flight path. Those pilots had to have ice water in their veins.


    Agreed. What I don't quite grasp is how one can hold an F18 so steady that an 18 to 36" separation between wingtips is considered sufficient at 300 knots. How do you control the aircraft so precisely with never an error despite turbulence and other variations? The other question is how they know their position and speed so accurately when approaching to meet at "crowd center" while approaching at a combined speed of 400 knots or more from opposite directions?
  3.  
    They do not always know and there are craters that prove it.