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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2010 edited
     
    Discharges from TinselKoil 2.0, photographed with a Canon DSLR.

    Including such nice things as plasma sheets, ball lightning nodules, and burning air gases.



  1.  
    looks like something that Capt Kirk and the boys would see on the main viewer.
  2.  
    Beautiful.
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      CommentAuthorGrowler
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2010
     
    Wow! I'd love to set something like that up here, but I expect you were using some fairly sophisticated kit? What were the camera settings / lenses etc?
  3.  
    Great stuff Al, beautiful. Could you also post the EXIF of each shot?
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2010 edited
     
    Thanks, it was a borrowed camera and cameraman; TK was operating the coil (TinselKoil 2.0 with the low aspect ratio resonator, f0 around 350 kHz, and staccato mode at about 5 percent duty cycle and 1 Hz); the best shots came from setting everything to manual, shutter on "bulb", opening the shutter with the cable release, firing the coil for a single burst in stacatto, and then closing the shutter. I'll have to see if I can get the metadata on the lens and f-stops, but it was, I think, a 35-100 mm or thereabouts macro zoom, stopped down pretty far, like f/14 or maybe even f/22.
    Some other good shots came from just letting the camera autofire 10 frames or so at its fastest frame rate with 1/250 shutter and f/14 or f/22, while letting the coil run, then seeing if anything got caught. I think the second image above was from these shots.
    But the first way is better.
    The high res version of the ones with the plasma sheets really look nice as desktops. I did some minimal "dust spotting" retouching to make the blacks nice and solid, but no color or contrast or other adjustments have been applied.
    Room as dark as possible, black velvet background, solid tripod.
    Oh, and focus on an object, held where the arc will be, while the lights are on.
  4.  
    Posted By: Citizen Wolflooks like something that Capt Kirk and the boys would see on the main viewer.


    My initial thought exactly.

    And there are those who would say that cosmic structures are formed by exactly the same electrodynamic processes as these psarks, only writ large.

    And I'm not so sure I would disagree.
  5.  
    Let me know if you come across any scantily clad green ladies.
  6.  
    Posted By: alsetalokinbest shots came from setting everything to manual, shutter on "bulb"


    Using "Bulb" is "Bold" for shots moving at the speed of light! I bet the ISO was way up high - How did you manage to get the environment so dark for that? Again - fantastic shots - much respect.
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      CommentAuthorskeletor
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2010
     
    awesome! now if you only had a high speed camcorder..
  7.  
    altesalokin
    beutiful pictures

    ou should try capture some high speed footage of them / should be even more spectacular
    you can get a digital camera that shoots 1000 frames per second for a couple hundred dollars / i think it is made by casio

    i was shown some high speed video of igniting gas
    thinking she filmed it in the lab i was about to criticise the poor quality and tell her who to talk to about setting up the cameras properly but before i could say anything she told me she had filemd it at home with a 200 dollar camera she had just bought
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: SearchingHighAndLow
    Posted By: alsetalokinbest shots came from setting everything to manual, shutter on "bulb"


    Using "Bulb" is "Bold" for shots moving at the speed of light! I bet the ISO was way up high - How did you manage to get the environment so dark for that? Again - fantastic shots - much respect.

    Thanks. I don't recall the ISO setting but since I'm using the "bulb" setting and manual aperture it should be irrelevant...I think...this is where my film experience breaks down wrt DSLRs. If you are shooting in all manual, with no shutter speed or aperture automation, does the ISO setting matter for DSLRs? I used to do a lot of available light shooting with film SLRs, and I would generally load ISO 1600 but meter and shoot it at 3200 using aperture priority automation, and then pushprocess for density and contrast.

    I blacked out the room with opaque curtains over the single window and used a black velvet backdrop; the really really nice thing about the DSLR is that you can see an image right away, and adjust exposure with aperture in-camera to get good zonal coverage before taking the "money shots". And the other really really nice thing is that you can shoot hundreds of frames without worrying about processing; with film I usually get maybe one or two keepers from a 36 exposure roll, but with the DSLR I can keep one from a hundred and it doesn't feel bad at all.
  8.  
    the iso setting on a dslr affects the sensitivity just as it does with film

    it also affects how grainy a photo you get
    lower iso gives sharper image with less grain but also darker

    if you shoot 10 seconds with iso 100 you get about the same brightness and 1 second with iso 1000
  9.  
    Posted By: skeletorawesome! now if you only had a high speed camcorder..

    Thanks! I like these a lot too, and intend to take a lot more when I have the chance.

    The highspeed video camera I have access to is quite easy to use and has a ridiculously high max frame rate, 80,000 fps or something like that, but unfortunately it is B/W not color. Still, I think it will reveal interesting detail, and I'll be trying it pretty soon.

    I may look into getting one of the 200 dollar 1000 fps ones mentioned, but it will be next month before I can afford it.
  10.  
    aletsalokin
    you can get colour out of that 80k camera quite easily with your skills
    all you need is an rgb colourwheel synced to the frame
    you should be able to get reasonably good colour if you downsample the video to one sixth or one ninth frame rate
    that is shoot at 80k with the colourwheel then recode it at exactly one ninth frame rate
    you may need to fiddle a bit with the software to properly merge the differently coloured frames but i've seen some very good results with such a method
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: discombobulatorrthe iso setting on a dslr affects the sensitivity just as it does with film

    it also affects how grainy a photo you get
    lower iso gives sharper image with less grain but also darker

    if you shoot 10 seconds with iso 100 you get about the same brightness and 1 second with iso 1000


    Yes, I understand that is true when automation is used. The ISO setting determines the combination of shutter speed and aperture. And it seems that you are saying that it affects the basic sensitivity of the CCD imaging chip...rather than simply the metering? Thanks...

    I don't seem to have the metadata with any of the original pics here. But if I followed my usual practice for self-illuminated objects in low ambient light I probably set the ISO at 400. But then, if I was thinking that it wouldn't matter since I was in all-manual mode...there's really no telling.

    I did determine that the camera was a Canon EOS Rebel XTi

    Sorry I can't be more precise. I may be able to get more info from the owner of the camera, if I see him tomorrow.

    EDIT to correct the ISO number cited...it's been a long time, brain is ossified
  11.  
    Posted By: discombobulatorraletsalokin
    you can get colour out of that 80k camera quite easily with your skills
    all you need is an rgb colourwheel synced to the frame
    you should be able to get reasonably good colour if you downsample the video to one sixth or one ninth frame rate
    that is shoot at 80k with the colourwheel then recode it at exactly one ninth frame rate
    you may need to fiddle a bit with the software to properly merge the differently coloured frames but i've seen some very good results with such a method


    That's a great idea, and I actually think I could do it that way. Thanks for the suggestion!! We have, I believe, the appropriate filter wheel laying around somewhere...if I can find it.
  12.  
    yes the ad converters actually get to see a higher voltage for a given amount of light